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Diwali is also called as Festival of Lights. How many of us wait for the festival just to see the colorful night and eat the sweets that are being made at home by our mothers? Diwali, though is a festival of Hindus, is celebrated by all in the country in different ways.

People follow a lot of traditions before and during diwali. Before Diwali, they clean their houses, make special sweets, buy new clothes, buy crackers and on the day of diwali , people enjoy themselves wearing these and in addition light lamps or diyas all around and make their houses fill with the light of those diyas.

No wonder this festival is called Festival of Lights. In many parts of India, the festivities start with “Dhanteras” (in northern and western part of India), followed by “Naraka Chaturdasi” on the second day, “Deepavali” on the third day, “Diwali Padva” dedicated to wife-husband relationship on the fourth day, and the festivities end with “Bhai Doojde” dedicated to sister-brother bond on the fifth day.

diwali

No wonder this festival is called Festival of Lights. In many parts of India, the festivities start with “Dhanteras” (in northern and western part of India), followed by “Naraka Chaturdasi” on the second day, “Deepavali” on the third day, “Diwali Padva” dedicated to wife-husband relationship on the fourth day, and the festivities end with “Bhai Doojde” dedicated to sister-brother bond on the fifth day.

Over the centuries, Diwali has become a national festival that is enjoyed by most Indians regardless of faith: Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Sikhs.Hindus interpret the Diwali story based upon where they live:

  • In northern India, they celebrate the story of King Rama’s return to Ayodhya after he defeated Ravana by lighting rows of clay lamps.
  • Southern India celebrates it as the day that Lord Krishna defeated the demon Narakasura.
  • In western India, the festival marks the day that Lord Vishnu, the Preserver (one of the main gods of the Hindu trinity) sent the demon King Bali to rule the nether world.

Out of all these stories, one common thread is true that, the festival marks the victory of good over evil.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LIGHTS AND FIRECRACKERS

All of the simple rituals of Diwali have some significance in them. Homes are illuminated with lights and firecrackers fill the skies as an expression of respect to the heavens for the attainment of health, wealth, knowledge, peace, and prosperity.

According to one belief, the sound of firecrackers indicates the joy of the people living on earth, making the gods aware of their plentiful state. Still another possible reason has a more scientific basis: the fumes produced by the firecrackers kill many insects and mosquitoes, which are plentiful after the rains.

THE SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE OF DIWALI

Beyond the lights and fun, Diwali is also a time to reflect on life and make changes for the upcoming year. With that, there are a number of customs that revelers hold dear each year.

Give and Forgive. It is common practice that everyone forgets and forgives the wrongs done by others during Diwali. There is an air of freedom, festivity, and friendliness everywhere.

Rise and Shine. Waking up during the Brahmamuhurta (at 4 a.m. or 1 1/2 hours before sunrise) is a great blessing from the standpoint of health, ethical discipline, efficiency in work, and spiritual advancement. It is on Diwali that everyone wakes up early in the morning. The sages who instituted this custom must have cherished the hope that their descendants would realize its benefits and make it a regular habit in their lives.

Unite and Unify. Diwali is a great unifying force and it can soften even the hardest of hearts. It is a time when you will find people mingling about in joy and embracing one another with love.

Those with keen inner spiritual ears will clearly hear the voice of the sages, “O Children of God unite, and love all”. The vibrations produced by the greetings of love, which fill the atmosphere, are powerful. When the heart has considerably hardened, only a continuous celebration of Diwali can rekindle the urgent need of turning away from the ruinous path of hatred.

Prosper and Progress. Homes are cleaned and decorated by day and illuminated by night with earthen oil lamps. This festival instills charity in the hearts of people and good deeds are performed everywhere. New business or anything a person wants to begin, is begun on diwali day as the day is believed to be prosper and auspicious.

Illuminate Your Inner Self. The lights of Diwali also signify a time of inner illumination. Hindus believe that the light of lights is the one that steadily shines in the chamber of the heart. Sitting quietly and fixing the mind on this supreme light illuminates the soul. It is an opportunity to cultivate and enjoy eternal bliss.

From darkness unto light

From darkness unto light—the light that empowers us to commit ourselves to good deeds, that which brings us closer to divinity. During Diwali, lights illuminate every corner of India and the scent of incense sticks hangs in the air, mingled with the sounds of firecrackers, joy, togetherness, and hope.

 

This Diwali, let’s do good and realize the real meaning of Diwali by illuminating our souls, and with good deeds along with sweets, happiness and crackers. Happy Diwali all!

 


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An aspiring writer and poet who is always dreaming beyond imagination. Hits reality only when boredom strikes.Believes in positivity and self confidence. Loves pen and paper.Writes in lucid language so that every one can understand and relate with it. Believes in the quote, "Failure is the key to success"
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